Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Predator

Some of Your Beeswax

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Considering the Next Move

Sugar and Spice

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Search Results for: crab spider

Alien Presence

Spider, Wildflower, Yellow, Green, Crab Spider, Hidden
Doing its best to blend in with the simple beauty of this wildflower, a stealthy crab spider awaits an unsuspecting victim.

I love watching the viewers reaction to shots like this.  At first you see the beauty of the flower. An instant later, your brain registers the spider. How did you respond?

To get a better view of the spider and other details in this image, click on it and a larger version will open in a new browser tab.

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Garden Cafe

Spider, Crab Spider, Flower, Yellow, Green
On a walk though the woods I came upon this crab spider enjoying his freshly caught lunch.

The crab spider will just sit still near the center of the flower, doing it’s best to blend in.  When an unsuspecting insect lands to gather pollen, the snatches it and lunch is served.

You can get even closer to the action by clicking on the photo. A larger version will open in a new browser tab.

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Tiny Surprise

Danger lurks here!  When I took this photo on a walk through the woods, I saw only a nice collection of wild violets. It wasn’t until I viewed this image on my computer that I noticed the tiny crab spider hiding in the bloom on the left.

Crab spiders don’t make webs.  They hide, often in flowers, waiting for unsuspecting insects to be drawn by the flower’s nectar or pollen.

I’ve posted photos of crab spiders before – even with a short video of one trying grab lunch – that can be viewed HERE.

To view a larger image of this photo, click on it.

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Guarding the Beauty

This is kind of a beauty-and-the-beast image.  The Dianthus flowers in our yard caught my eye.  As I moved in to take the shot, the little crab spider made himself known. I didn’t see him until I was right on top of him.  I backed off…then moved in…then backed off…then moved in.  When I moved in, he would take an aggressive stance.  When I backed off, he would relax.  Whatever his strategy was, it must have worked well since, judging by the girth of his tiny frame, I’d say he hadn’t missed any meals.

This photo was taken several years ago with my old Kodak camera. A little “vintage” Pops Digital for you.

For a closer look, click on the photo.

The Stand Off

While photographing wildflowers I noticed yellow spiders hiding among the foliage. I believe they are in the crab spider family. They seemed to be waiting for prey to come by. That was, in fact, the case. (See some of my previous posts.)

I’d been photographing these yellow spiders on purple thistles.  Then I noticed a similar spider on a yellow flower.  While I was taking his picture, a soldier beetle landed on the flower. I wondered what would happen.

After taking a few photos, I decided to switch to taking video.  I remembered nature films I’d seen where an alligator snatches an unsuspecting antelope that stopped for a drink. I thought this, on a decidedly smaller scale, might provide the same kind of drama.

I only got a short, six seconds of video.  It looked like the solider beetle bumped into the spider and then flew off.  Not too dramatic.  However, when I slowed the video down, it turns out it was a much closer call than I originally thought.

Watch the video below and pay particular attention to the slow motion footage.  When slowed down, you can see the spider actually grabs the leg of the soldier beetle in its jaws.  The beetle is able to pull away before the spider can get a better hold. The best way to view it is to click the full-screen icon in the lower right corner of the video box.

Click on the photo at the top to see a lager version.