Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Predator

Some of Your Beeswax

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Considering the Next Move

Sugar and Spice

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Birds

Bottom View

This American Goldfinch (male) was hanging on the top of the finch feeder, waiting for an opening on one of the perches below. As you can see, it’s a popular neighborhood dining spot.

This image was taken on a drab and drizzly day, so you’ll notice his feathers appear a bit damp.

There is no shortage of Goldfinches at our house – year round.  (Might have something to do with the food we put out.)  It’s nice to see them back in their bright yellow and black plumage for the spring and summer.

(Click on the main image for a larger view.)

The Duchess Curtsies Before the Duke

This prim and proper lady enters the grand dining hall with a curtsey.  The camera caught this female mourning dove landing on the the edge of the feeder in such a way that it reminded me of a curtsy.  The proud posturing of the male made it seem more so…at least, to me.

It’s springtime so, as you would expect, they’re trying to impress one another.

The smaller image is the same pair just hanging out together.

We get quite a collection of mourning doves at our house.

(Click either image to view a larger version.)

Sandhill Crane

This is a Sandhill Crane. They’ve recently migrated back to our area of Wisconsin. You know their back in the area long before you see one by their amazingly loud and irritating call. Sandhill Cranes are large birds, standing nearly 4 ft tall with a wingspan of 6 to 8 feet. (Learn more about Sandhill Cranes HERE)

These exotic birds have become common during the warmer months but are very difficult to photograph (at least, for me) because they are extremely shy.  When you attempt to get close enough to capture a good image they flee.

This opportunity came by chance.  I was driving home and noticed a pair of cranes grazing near the road a couple of hundred yards before my house.  I drove by and turned around when I thought I was far enough away that I wouldn’t spook them.  I got my camera out of the case and then headed back down the road.  (I try to always keep my camera with me.)

I took this photo while driving with one hand holding the camera and one hand on the wheel.  I was the only vehicle on the road and moved as slow as I thought I could without sending the birds to flight.  Even at 30-mph, the cranes became agitated and started to move.  They were out of range before I could circle back for another shot.

I will keep a lookout for more opportunities to capture Sandhill Cranes.  If I succeed, you’ll see them on this blog.

(Click the photo to view a larger image.)

Bluebird Hatch

Just hours old, these bluebirds are waiting for their siblings to hatch. All of them successfully hatched and fledged.

I shot this by lifting the top off the bluebird house and shooting straight down with my Kodak Easyshare DX7590.  This photo was taken in early June of 2010.

(Click the image to see a larger version.)

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Pretty Bird

These guys are harder to photograph than I had imagined.

There’s an avairy in the lobby of a nursing home where I visit a friend.  I’ve walked by it a hundred times and admired the dozen or more birds that are part of the display.  Since my friend wasn’t up for much of a visit, I stopped on my way out and fired up the camera.

These guys are fast! They rarely pause for more than a second or two.  They are continually bouncing from one perch to another, squabbling with one another or preening with their head under a wing or other unsightly places.  My camera has a “Continuous Advance” setting, where, if you hold the shutter button down, it will keep clicking off photos.  I held the button down for a round of about 7 shots and not one of them caught the bird in an appealing pose.  This is one of those times where I snapped 60-70 photos and only kept two.

The aviary is constructed of oak and plexiglass, so I employed a Circular Polarizing filter to cut down on the glare.  It didn’t totally eliminate it, but it helped.  I don’t notice any glare in this image.

(Click on the photo to view a larger image.)