Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Some of Your Beeswax

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Flowers

Petals of Purple

Today, please accept my simple gift of purple.

Studies show colors can affect us mentally and physically.  It’s said the color purple can be uplifting, calming to the mind and nerves, offering a sense of spirituality and encouraging creativity.

I’m sorry, I don’t know what kind of flower this is. I found it was flourishing in a flowerbed in rural Indiana.

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Tiny Dancers

This spray of Forget Me Nots remind me of giddy, forest sprites dancing among the greenery.

With the dreary, winter weather we’ve been experiencing lately, I thought a spring-like image would be welcome. (No need to thank me.)

Forget Me Nots are some of my favorite flowers.  However, they are so small, I have rarely captured an image of them that I really like.  I really like this one.

I put my index finger into the photo on the right to give you a reference for how tiny these little beauties are.

According to Wikipedia:
Myosotis (maɪ.əˈsoʊtɪs; from the Greek: “mouse’s ear”, after the leaf) is a genus of flowering plants in the family Boraginaceae that are commonly called Forget-me-nots. Its common name was calqued from the French, ne m’oubliez pas and first used in English in c. 1532.

To see a larger version of the main photo, just click on it.

Guarding the Beauty

This is kind of a beauty-and-the-beast image.  The Dianthus flowers in our yard caught my eye.  As I moved in to take the shot, the little crab spider made himself known. I didn’t see him until I was right on top of him.  I backed off…then moved in…then backed off…then moved in.  When I moved in, he would take an aggressive stance.  When I backed off, he would relax.  Whatever his strategy was, it must have worked well since, judging by the girth of his tiny frame, I’d say he hadn’t missed any meals.

This photo was taken several years ago with my old Kodak camera. A little “vintage” Pops Digital for you.

For a closer look, click on the photo.

Colorful Queen Ann’s Lace

I’m not overly particular about my subjects.  I take photos of anything that catches my eye.  This was something that caught my eye because I found it unusual.

This is common Queen Ann’s Lace.  Normally the delicate flowers are snow white and create a full bouquet – with little space between the blooms.  The color and sparse display for this bunch must be due to the onset of colder weather.  Normally the stems are a simple green, not the purplish-red color seen here.  (This photo was take this fall.)

You can view a larger version by clicking on the photo.

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The Center of Passion

There is something about this image that captivates me. I’d like to say it was taken in some exotic location, but it wasn’t. It is the center of a poppy from the flower bed beside our home.

Of course, it’s the rich, deep red of the petals that initially grab me.  However,  it’s the purple center, ringed by the dark seeds, that keep me staring.

I realize this is one of those images that either trips your trigger…or not.   Feel free to leave a comment, either way.

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Thistles on Display

I took a walk through the woods in Missouri and came across this clump of thistles.

I have a difficult time walking outdoors with my camera and not photographing every flower of color I encounter…even if I have a dozen images of the same kind flower…even when they’re weeds.

Here’s a little of what Wikipedia says about thistles…

Thistle is the common name of a group of flowering plants characterised by leaves with sharp prickles on the margins, mostly in the family Asteraceae. Prickles often occur all over the plant – on surfaces such as those of the stem and flat parts of leaves. These are an adaptation that protects the plant against herbivorous animals, discouraging them from feeding on the plant. Typically, an involucre with a clasping shape of a cup or urn subtends each of a thistle’s flowerheads.

In the language of flowers, the thistle (like the burr) is an ancient Celtic symbol of nobility of character as well as of birth, for the wounding or provocation of a thistle yields punishment.

The thistle has been the national emblem of Scotland since the reign of Alexander III (1249–1286) and was used on silver coins issued by James III in 1470. It is the symbol of the Order of the Thistle, a high chivalric order of Scotland. It is found in many Scottish symbols and as the name of several Scottish football clubs. The thistle, crowned with the Scottish crown, is the symbol of seven of the eight Scottish Police Forces (the exception being the Northern Constabulary). The thistle is also the emblem of Encyclopædia Britannica, which originated in Edinburgh, Scotland. Carnegie Mellon University features the thistle in its crest.

According to a legend, an invading Norse army was attempting to sneak up at night upon a Scottish army’s encampment. During this operation one barefoot Norseman had the misfortune to step upon a thistle, causing him to cry out in pain, thus alerting Scots to the presence of the Norse invaders.

You can see a larger image of the thistles by clicking on them.

Sunshine on a Stalk

Keep your face to the sunshine and you cannot see the shadow. It’s what sunflowers do. – Helen Keller

The sunflowers are in bloom!  In our area, we are blessed with several fields of sunflowers every summer – thanks to our good neighbors, the Kuehl Seed Farm.

When the field is on a main highway, it is quite common to see people pull over, jump out and snap a couple of pictures with a digital camera.  And who can blame them.  A field of sunflowers in full bloom is so bright and cheerful it’s natural to want to take it home with you.  This field of flowers is on Highway 42, Just north of Kewaunee, WI. (While I was taking these photos at least four other cars stopped to do the same.)

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Messy Hands

This is an image that dates back to 2006. This photo was the initial inspiration for my experimentation and reasonable success with macro photography.

My old camera, a Kodak Easyshare DX7590, did an exceptional job with macro shots.  When I saw what was possible – after taking this image – I started to major on the minors.  I can spend hours crouched down by a flower bed,  moving slowly, trying to be unnoticed while I position my camera as close as possible to any tiny creatures I can find.  I was just a few inches from this bee when I snapped this photo.

I love seeing the normally, unseen details of God’s creation. For instance, in this image, I am facinated by the bee’s wings, the pollen on the flower and bee’s legs, that little dongle thing protruding from the bee’s head, it’s eyes and the orange tipped spears of the cone flower.

If you find this image appealing, please feel free to share it with friends.  (If you’re on Facebook, simply click one of the Facebook links below this story.)

To see a larger version and even more detail, click the photo.