Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Predator

Some of Your Beeswax

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Considering the Next Move

Sugar and Spice

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Pops Photos

Rural Sunset

Just another stunning sunset at our rural Kewaunee County, WI home. I snapped this a few minutes after the sun dipped below the horizon on Tuesday, May 17, 2011.

I took these with my Sony SLT-A55.  I used the “sunset” setting on the above photo. The photo below was taken using the “sweep panorama” mode.

(Click on either image to see a larger version.)

Oriole

“I  just flew in from Baltimore…and boy are my wings tired!”

We have a few orioles that show up this time of year. They like the oranges we put out. This guy still has a little orange stuck to his beak.

According to Wikipedia.org – – The Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) is a small icterid blackbird that averages 18 cm long and weighs 34 g. This bird received its name from the fact that the male’s colors resemble those on the coat-of-arms of Lord Baltimore.

Adults have a pointed bill and white bars on the wings. The adult male is orange on the underparts, shoulder patch and rump. All of the rest of the male is black. The adult female is yellow-brown on the upper parts with darker wings, and dull orange on the breast and belly.

The Baltimore Oriole’s nest is a tightly woven pouch located on the end of a branch, hanging down on the underside.

Baltimore Orioles forage in trees and shrubs, also making short flights to catch insects. They mainly eat insects, berries and nectar, and are often seen sipping at hummingbird feeders. Oriole feeders contain essentially the same food as hummingbird feeders, but are designed for orioles, and are orange instead of red and have larger perches. Baltimore Orioles are also fond of halved oranges and grape jelly.

(Click the photo to see a larger version.)

Bright Spot in My Day

Scarlet Tanager

The color of this bird is so vivid, it almost hurts your eyes.  This Scarlet Tanager was perched in the middle of our apple tree when I took this photo.  A spot where a lot of birds would blend in and not be noticed. This guy was an obvious stand out.

This is the first Scarlet Tanager we’ve seen at our home in rural Kewaunee County, Wisconsin. It seems he was just stopping for a snack on his way to wherever he’ll spend his summer.  He spent the afternoon alternating between the apple tree and the platform feeder where he ate on the  oranges we have out for orioles and house finches.

According to Wikipedia – – The Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) is a medium-sized American songbird. Formerly placed in the tanager family (Thraupidae), it and other members of its genus are now classified in the cardinal family (Cardinalidae).The species’s plumage and vocalizations are similar to other members of the cardinal family. Adults have pale stout smooth bills.

Adult males are bright red with black wings and tail; females are yellowish on the underparts and olive on top, with olive-brown wings and tail. The adult male’s winter plumage is similar to the female’s, but the wings and tail remain darker.Scarlet Tanagers are often out of sight, foraging high in trees, sometimes flying out to catch insects in flight. They eat mainly insects and fruit.

(Click the images for a larger view.) 

Flying Circus

There are times when I look out the window of our rural home and think, “What a circus!”  Birds are flying in every direction to take advantage of a free meal from one of our many feeders.

Of all the birds we see, the American Goldfinches are among the most active and consistent performers at our house. It can be quite entertaining to watch them zipping in and out; hither and yon.

When frozen by the camera, the Goldfinch’s quick, bouncy style of flight seems unnatural and awkward.

All of the birds in this photo are American Goldfinches – except the one Chipping Sparrow whose tail can bee seen as he perches on the back side of the feeder.

(Click the image for a larger version.)

Bottom View

This American Goldfinch (male) was hanging on the top of the finch feeder, waiting for an opening on one of the perches below. As you can see, it’s a popular neighborhood dining spot.

This image was taken on a drab and drizzly day, so you’ll notice his feathers appear a bit damp.

There is no shortage of Goldfinches at our house – year round.  (Might have something to do with the food we put out.)  It’s nice to see them back in their bright yellow and black plumage for the spring and summer.

(Click on the main image for a larger view.)

Curly Top


For me, the most difficult part of photographing people is capturing an authentic natural expression. Much of what I end up with is nice, but lacking the true essence of the person I’m trying capture.

I’m pretty pleased with the way this one turned out.

(Click the image to see a larger version.)

Fashion and Friends


What little girl doesn’t like “dress up” and stuffed animal friends.

I’ve had the opportunity to focus on a couple of cuties the last few days.  This one loves to pose for the camera.

Portraits have not been my strong suit…but I’m working on it.

(Click on the main image for a larger view.)

Kewaunee’s Premium Blend

The best part of waking up…  The sky provided a blend of beautiful colors, layered from the red of the sun on the horizon to the blue, high in the early morning sky.

I made my way to the shore of Lake Michigan – to the Kewaunee, WI beach – to catch a 5:40 am sunrise on the morning of Saturday, April 30, 2011.

It’s interesting to see the different transformations that the sky goes through in the course of a half hour sunrise.  For a different look of the same sunrise, see my previous post “Morning Beam.”

(Click the photo for a slightly larger view.)

Morning Beam

I got up early last Saturday to take sunrise photos of the Kewaunee, WI lighthouse.  This is a photo from the end of the shoot.  The sun was up enough that it was out of the frame but you can’t miss it’s power by the prominent beam of light.

More from this shoot will be posted in the next few days. Keep checking back or simply subscribe to the RSS feed.

(Click on the image for a larger view.)

Prelude to Night

Nighttime seemed to be moving in from the upper left-hand corner of this image.

This was the sunset viewed at our rural Kewaunee County, WI home on Easter Sunday, April 24, 2011.  The beauty lasted all of 10 minutes…maybe less.

(Click the photo to view a larger version.)