Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Predator

Some of Your Beeswax

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Considering the Next Move

Sugar and Spice

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Bee

Watchful Eye

Here’s a little touch of nature for you.  I stopped to take some photos around the harbor at Algoma, Wisconsin.  It wasn’t a foggy day elsewhere, but conditions were right to create a foggy area around the piers and lighthouse.  I took a few photos (some I’ll be posting later) of the pier and a fisherman in the fog, and the lighthouse and boats.

As I finished and headed back to my vehicle, I noticed a few wildflowers growing near the water.  I stopped to take a few random shots.  Then I noticed a few bees – always a favorite photographic subject of mine – so I stopped to take a few photos of them.  Then, as I started to leave again, I noticed a flash of yellow.  An American Goldfinch landed in a nearby patch of thistles to enjoy a meal.  It didn’t seem  bothered by my presence, so I started taking photos.  (Some I’ll post later.)

While concentrating on the Goldfinch, I happened to notice a bee in the foreground and refocused on the bee for awhile…as the bird continued to feast in the background.

The one thing I don’t like about this image (and others in the batch) is the background.  I think it looks unnatural and fake. The background is simply the water of the harbor.  I would have preferred something that had a little more color variation, instead of the flat blue, but I wasn’t able to change my position to create a different look.  The thistles were only a foot or two from the water and I was shooting from a position higher than the bird.

If you’d like to see a larger version, just click on the photo.

This photo, and another cropped version, is available for sale. To see pricing, click on the blue bar below.

Covering the Cosmos

We planted a patch of wildflowers next to our vegetable garden.  Unfortunately, the weeds are out performing the flowers.  Out of the several varieties that made up the wildflower mix we planted, the cosmos did best.  This is one that attracted some of the local wildlife.

If you have a large monitor and would like to get an even closer look, click on the image and it will open in another tab.

Center of the Cosmos

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This bee was about some serious bee work on the center of a purple cosmos flower. I don’t recall seeing this particular type of bee before – with white hair, orange antennae and a yellowish-green eye. However, this year I’ve photographed several.

To get a better view of this bee and the flower, click on it and a larger version will open in a new tab.

Three’s a Crowd

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A couple of bees were working on this Sunflower when an ant decided to enter the picture. This is a flower in my wife’s flower bed. Not a flower she planted. One that was added by the birds dropping seeds from the feeders.

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Popular Spot

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Flowers are blooming and the bees are buzzing.  This proved to be a popular spot in the meadow.  Honey bees and bumble bees were frequenting this clump of purple spiderswort. It was early morning – maybe 6:30 (notice the dew still on the plants) – and they were already hard at it.

To get this shot, I put my camera on a tripod and simply focused on a colorful, well lit clump of flowers and waited.  When a bee would enter into the scene, I would start clicking.  The bees you see here are exactly how I photographed them…but they were never in the shot together.  Since the focus and framing never changed, it was easy to combine the various bees from separate images into one.

To get a better view of the image details, click on it  and a larger version will open in another tab.

The Beeline

Beeline (noun) 1. direct, straight course.  2. To move swiftly in a direct, straight course.

One of my “quests” this summer was to capture a bee in flight.  They’re small, quick and errattic.  Hard to catch in focus. So far, none of my efforts have come close to what I would deem, “successful.”

The image above is the best I’ve managed…so far…and it was by accident. (That  happens more than I might like to admit.)

I was taking photos around a flower bed beside our house.  While I was changing camera settings, I accidentally pressed the shutter button.  A that exact moment, a bee happened to be zipping into the frame…and voilá.

If I were trying for it, I wouldn’t try in black and white, but looking at this, I really like the intensity it creates.  The bee – with his straight antennae, trailing legs and blurred wings – looks like he is on a do-or-die mission and will not be denied.

To see a larger version of this image, just click on it.

To see more bee photos, check out the Bugs & Spiders gallery.

Fatal Attraction

I discovered yellow spiders hiding among the the thistles.  I assumed they were waiting for unsuspecting prey.  I took some photos, downloaded them to my computer and posted them to this blog under the title Dangerously Alluring Beauty.

Several hours later, I went back to check on them. I was right! This is the same thistle and spider from the previous post.

As you can see, a small bee, buzzing from flower to flower, attracted by the thistle, received an instant invitation to lunch.

The image on the right is the same scene from a different angle.

I wish I had hung around long enough to catch the action live.  However, it just so happens, when I finished photographing this carnage, I noticed a similar yellow spider, poised with arms open wide, waiting for a its meal on a yellow flower. Then a bug came along. I started snapping pictures. The bug walked around the flower until it finally came face to face with the spider…and then…

You’ll have to watch for those images in a future post to see how it turned out.

To view larger versions of either of these photos, just click on them.

Messy Hands

This is an image that dates back to 2006. This photo was the initial inspiration for my experimentation and reasonable success with macro photography.

My old camera, a Kodak Easyshare DX7590, did an exceptional job with macro shots.  When I saw what was possible – after taking this image – I started to major on the minors.  I can spend hours crouched down by a flower bed,  moving slowly, trying to be unnoticed while I position my camera as close as possible to any tiny creatures I can find.  I was just a few inches from this bee when I snapped this photo.

I love seeing the normally, unseen details of God’s creation. For instance, in this image, I am facinated by the bee’s wings, the pollen on the flower and bee’s legs, that little dongle thing protruding from the bee’s head, it’s eyes and the orange tipped spears of the cone flower.

If you find this image appealing, please feel free to share it with friends.  (If you’re on Facebook, simply click one of the Facebook links below this story.)

To see a larger version and even more detail, click the photo.