Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Predator

Some of Your Beeswax

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Considering the Next Move

Sugar and Spice

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Bird

Bright Spot in My Day

Scarlet Tanager

The color of this bird is so vivid, it almost hurts your eyes.  This Scarlet Tanager was perched in the middle of our apple tree when I took this photo.  A spot where a lot of birds would blend in and not be noticed. This guy was an obvious stand out.

This is the first Scarlet Tanager we’ve seen at our home in rural Kewaunee County, Wisconsin. It seems he was just stopping for a snack on his way to wherever he’ll spend his summer.  He spent the afternoon alternating between the apple tree and the platform feeder where he ate on the  oranges we have out for orioles and house finches.

According to Wikipedia – – The Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) is a medium-sized American songbird. Formerly placed in the tanager family (Thraupidae), it and other members of its genus are now classified in the cardinal family (Cardinalidae).The species’s plumage and vocalizations are similar to other members of the cardinal family. Adults have pale stout smooth bills.

Adult males are bright red with black wings and tail; females are yellowish on the underparts and olive on top, with olive-brown wings and tail. The adult male’s winter plumage is similar to the female’s, but the wings and tail remain darker.Scarlet Tanagers are often out of sight, foraging high in trees, sometimes flying out to catch insects in flight. They eat mainly insects and fruit.

(Click the images for a larger view.) 

Bottom View

This American Goldfinch (male) was hanging on the top of the finch feeder, waiting for an opening on one of the perches below. As you can see, it’s a popular neighborhood dining spot.

This image was taken on a drab and drizzly day, so you’ll notice his feathers appear a bit damp.

There is no shortage of Goldfinches at our house – year round.  (Might have something to do with the food we put out.)  It’s nice to see them back in their bright yellow and black plumage for the spring and summer.

(Click on the main image for a larger view.)

Bluebird Hatch

Just hours old, these bluebirds are waiting for their siblings to hatch. All of them successfully hatched and fledged.

I shot this by lifting the top off the bluebird house and shooting straight down with my Kodak Easyshare DX7590.  This photo was taken in early June of 2010.

(Click the image to see a larger version.)

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Pretty Bird

These guys are harder to photograph than I had imagined.

There’s an avairy in the lobby of a nursing home where I visit a friend.  I’ve walked by it a hundred times and admired the dozen or more birds that are part of the display.  Since my friend wasn’t up for much of a visit, I stopped on my way out and fired up the camera.

These guys are fast! They rarely pause for more than a second or two.  They are continually bouncing from one perch to another, squabbling with one another or preening with their head under a wing or other unsightly places.  My camera has a “Continuous Advance” setting, where, if you hold the shutter button down, it will keep clicking off photos.  I held the button down for a round of about 7 shots and not one of them caught the bird in an appealing pose.  This is one of those times where I snapped 60-70 photos and only kept two.

The aviary is constructed of oak and plexiglass, so I employed a Circular Polarizing filter to cut down on the glare.  It didn’t totally eliminate it, but it helped.  I don’t notice any glare in this image.

(Click on the photo to view a larger image.)