Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Black

Paper Kite

Butterfly, Paper Kite, Black, White, Wings, Idea leuconoe
This beautiful, high-contrast butterfly is known by the name, Paper Kite.  It’s technical name is Idea Leuconoe.  The name game doesn’t stop there, either.  It’s also called a Wood Nymph butterfly, Large Tree Nymph butterfly or simply, Rice Paper butterfly.

The Paper Kite has a weak, fluttery flight interspersed with gliding due to the high ratio of their wing-size to body-size.  You would think, with their bright color and bold  pattern, they would easily fall victim to predators, but like monarch butterflies, they are poisonous or highly unpalatable and are not often attacked.

The Paper Kite’s natural territory is Southeast Asia.  Apparently, it is a common resident in butterfly greenhouses and live butterfly expositions. I found this one at the Butterfly Palace and Rainforest Adventure in Branson, MO.

You can view a larger version of this image by simply clicking on it.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

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Dead Leaf Butterfly – Open

Dead Leaf Butterfly, Butterfly, Wings, Kallima inachus
This is the colorful side of the Dead Leaf Butterfly. The coloring and marking on the upper side of their wings is dramatically different from the bottom side of the wings.

When the wings are folded up, this butterfly looks just like a brown, dried leaf. Its camouflage is very convincing. (See my previous post – Dead Leaf Butterfly) As you can see in this photo, when the Dead Leaf Butterfly opens its wings, it becomes an attractive, exotic beauty.

The Dead Leaf Butterfly  is a nymphalid butterfly found in tropical Asia from India to Japan.

You can get a better view of the detail in this colorful side of the Dead Leaf by looking at the larger version; available by clicking on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

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Reclining Monarch

Butterfly, Monarch, Monarch Butterfly, Purple Aster, Wildflowers, This is a butterfly common to our neighborhood and most of North America. This is the much-loved monarch butterfly.  I found this one on a cool morning, perched among some purple asters growing wild in a field. Because of the early, cool conditions, this monarch was moving slow and the asters hadn’t opened yet.

Clicking on the photo will give you a better view, opening a larger version in a new browser tab.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

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Wild and Woolly

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar, Caterpillar, Orange, Black, Milkweed

This is one hungry, little dust-mop! Look at how much of that leaf it’s already consumed. It is a Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar.

When I took this picture, I didn’t notice the interesting, synchronized curl to those orange and white tufts of hair. It just looked like your run-of-the-mill fuzzy caterpillar. Enlarging the image, often reveals surprising aspects of the insect world.

By the way, the head is that shiny black part on the edge of the leaf, mostly covered by hair.  (He needs to trim his bangs.)

This was actually in a very difficult spot to photograph due to other vegetation being in the way. To try and get a better shot, I slowly, gently bent the leaf he was on. They must not have sticky feet because, at the slightest angel, it immediately slid off the leaf and into the dense weeds below…never to be seen again.

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Ugly Bug Feast

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My camera and I spent a warm summer morning roaming the woods of northwest Missouri.

I found small clearing with some wildflowers, including a number of beautiful Queen Ann’s Lace. On one bunch of Queen Ann’s Lace I spotted a black wasp with distinctive white stripes. It was easy to see the bed of white.

Upon closer inspection, it was obvious the wasp had died there  Then I noticed a smaller, ugly bug gnawing on it’s leg.  It took some searching and help from a friend to identify it as an Ambush Bug.

I watched it for awhile and saw the ambush bug try to carry the wasp off, but seemed unable. I think the wasps legs were stuck in the flower bed.

I made it a point to check back the next day and couldn’t find any sign of either parties.

To see a larger version of any of these images, simply click on them.