Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Fungi

Limited Shelf Life

Fall Leaves, Shelf Mushroom, Maple Leaf, Autumn, Autumn leaves, Autumn color
On one of my recent hikes through the autumn woods, I snapped a brightly colored maple leaf that found a resting place on a shelf mushroom.

For those not familiar, shelf mushrooms (or bracket fungi) grow on the side of trees (living and dead). When you find them, they’re usually attached to rough barked trees.

There are dozens of shelf mushroom varieties – different sizes, shapes and colors. They are known by a variety of descriptive names – beefsteak fungus, sulphur shelf, birch bracket, dryad’s saddle, artist’s conk, and turkey tail…and others.

The classification, Polypores, is often used for the type of the hard or leathery fungi (like the one pictured here) that lacks a stem, growing straight out of wood.  The polypore’s woody fruiting bodies are called conks.

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Tree Dwellers

Mushrooms, Fungi, Fungus, Tree, White Birch, Birch
It was a banner year for mushrooms in northeast Wisconsin.  An abundance of rainfall seemed to keep them sprouting up to, and even beyond, the first frosts.

I thought it was unusual to see so many mushrooms growing on a tree trunk. These healthy specimens were found in the woods of northeast Wisconsin.

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All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

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Mushrooms On Wood

Mushroom, Mushrooms, Tree, Toad Stool, Toad Stools
On a hike through the autumn woods, I thought it was odd to find these mushrooms growing out of a fallen tree. (Or are they toad stools?) In any case, they intrigued me.

You can view a larger, more detailed version of this image by clicking on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

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Flock of Fungi

Mushroom, Mushrooms, Fungi, White
Our area received a lot of rain late summer to autumn. That provided favorable conditions for mushrooms.  These are a just a few of the fungi bounty we discovered on a walk through Potawatomi Park near Sturgeon Bay, WI a few weeks ago.

You can view a larger, more detailed version of this image by clicking on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

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Coral Fungi

Coral Fungi, Mushroom, Forest

This is unusual stuff.  It’s a fresh bunch of coral fungi growing among the decaying mater on a N.E. Wisconsin forest floor.

Coral fungi is also commonly called club fungi. A more accurate name is clavarioid fungi. This type of fungi typically has erect, simple or branched basidiocarps (fruit bodies) that are formed on the ground, on decaying vegetation, or on dead wood.

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