Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Predator

Some of Your Beeswax

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Considering the Next Move

Sugar and Spice

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Sony SLT-A77V

Soft Touch

Flower, Green, White, Leaves, CyclamenThis is a flower that seems to bloom backward. The flower head is pointed down (notice the downward direction of the buds to each side) but the petals turn up. This plant is part of the Cyclamen genus.

I’d like to tell you that I took this photo of an exotic plant in some exotic foreign land but, alas, it was taken in the kitchen of our home. I was working on my camera, making micro-adjustments to the focus of my various lenses. It’s a process of fine tuning the auto focus function to account for the minor differences in lenses.  Even lenses of the same brand and model can have minor differences. The camera will focus each of them the same so focus could be off…usually just a bit and mostly unnoticeable, but still off.  Of course, we’re typically wanting a very precise focus on most of our images so tweaking settings to get it as close to perfect is a worthwhile endeavor.

So, after making my micro-adjustments, I just snapped a few photos to test the focus accuracy. This is one of those test shots. The plant is one my wife keeps on a cabinet in front of a window in our kitchen. I focused on it, taking advantage of the pleasing green of our lawn outside the window as the background. Of course, the lawn is out of the range of focus so you’re not seeing blades of grass; you just see a solid green background. You’ll also notice a kind of cross-hatch texture in the background. That effect was created by the window’s screen.

Sometimes, if your looking, you’ll find “interesting” and “exotic” in the most common places.

To view a potentially larger, full-screen version of this image, simply click on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Full Body Tattoo


Spider, Garden Spider, Yellow Garden Spider, Arachnid
I found this uniquely decorated spider hanging around in my wife’s flower bed. In our part of the world we call these large arachnids, yellow garden spiders. This spider falls under the Argiope Aurantia classification.

The markings on it’s abdomen remind me of a tattoo. I think it looks like a tattoo of some space alien.

Because of this spider’s size, it looks menacing but the Argiope genus are harmless to humans. Like most garden spiders, they eat insects, and they are capable of consuming prey up to twice their size. The etymology of Argiope is from a Greek name meaning “silver-faced”.

Because of the very sparse web this one is hanging on, I’m guessing it is a male since the females tend to have a large, more complicated web with a prominent zig-zag pattern in the center. (Here’s an example from my collection – Found On the Web.)

You can get a larger, more detailed view of this image by clicking on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

I Stand at the Door and Knock

Stained Glass, Window, Church Window, Church, One of the spectacular stained glass windows found in the sanctuary of the Centerburg Christian Church in Centerburg, Ohio. These, priceless, hand-painted windows date back to 1911.

This is just one of four very large stained glass windows, (and a number of smaller windows) that grace this church sanctuary. Each of large windows depict a Biblical teaching.  Hopefully I’ll have a chance to post more in the future.  A big, Thanks!, to Pastor Jeff Perry and the members of his flock for allowing me access to the building to capture and share the beauty and majesty of their stained glass.

The process to get this image was difficult. This windows are so large, I had to photograph them in sections.  To process them I had to stitch the individual photos together and then try to correct the natural distortion that comes from the lens and the angles inherent in photographing a large scene at close range.  I spent many hours on this one image and it is filled with flaws.  Still, the beauty created, more than a hundred years ago, by the stained glass artists overshadows any flaws in my processing.  Hopefully, with more practice, I’ll improve my process.

This is definitely an image you will want to look at enlarged, to witness the incredible color and detail in this glass.  Click on the image and a full-screen version will open in a new browser tab. Then be sure and click on the photo again and it will enlarge more for an even closer look.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Sugar and Spice

Child, Portrait, Baby, Toddler, Girl, Monochrome

What are little girls made of? Sugar and spice and everything nice. That’s what little girls are made of.

This is a portrait of one of our granddaughters.  We were blessed to have an opportunity to spend a little time with her and her parents recently.

Of course, whenever we have the pleasure of visits with any of the grandchildren, I usually try and grab a few photos. After this visit, as we were driving home, I told my wife I was disappointed that I wasn’t able to get any good photos of our granddaughter.  When I downloaded the day’s images to my computer I was delighted to find this gem.  This is the only decent image I captured of her on this visit, but it’s a definite keeper.

You can get a better look at those big, beautiful eyes by clicking on the photo. When you do, a full-screen version will open in a new browser tab.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Predator

Dandelion, Bee, Flower, Macro, Yellow, Green
This bee was persistent in his attack of this dandelion. My getting close didn’t seem to dissuade it.  As I approached, it would leave the flower, hovering a few inches above, and then settle back down for the work. That made it easy for me to get a good shot. The tiny butterflies I was trying to capture were considerably more shy. They vacated the blooms anytime I got within range.

This scene was captured on my own front lawn. I titled this one, “Predator,” because I think the bees face makes an ominous impression. I know I wouldn’t want to meet one in a dark alley.

You can view a larger, more detailed version of this photo by clicking on it.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Partial Eclipse 2017

Solar Eclipse, Partial Eclipse, Sun, Moon, Sky, Clouds
I was able to grab an image of the partial solar eclipse that appeared, filtered by light cloud cover, over Green Bay, Wisconsin on August 21, 2017.

I was working through the eclipse but took a short break to snap a few frames.  It was a bit tricky, since I didn’t really have much time or the proper equipment to photograph an eclipse.  I didn’t have any filters and didn’t use a tripod. Thankfully the light clouds provided some filtering effect and a little texture to the image.  I also used a tall spruce tree to add some foregroud context.

To capture this image I had to use some crazy camera settings – 1/3200 sec, f/40, ISO 50, 250mm.  Never actually looking at the sky, and hand holding the camera, I used the articulating screen on the back of my camera to find the sun and quickly snap my shots.  I didn’t want to stay focused on the sun for more than a moment because without the proper filter there was a risk of damaging the image sensor.  Of course, I increased the saturation in post processing.

This isn’t the best image, technically speaking, but at least I was able to grab a glimpse of the historic event in my area.

You can view a larger version of this image by clicking on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Early Morning Stretch

Pea, Plant, Green, Dew, VineSometimes I just pick up my camera and wander around my yard to see what I can see. On a recent morning stroll around the yard, just after sunrise, I snapped a few photos of the pea plants growing in the farm field that surrounds our property.

This shot appealed to me for several reasons… The green glow of the plant in the morning light, the tiny drops of dew still clinging to the plant in the cool of the morning, the graceful curve of the vine-like shoot and the small buds that will bloom a pretty purple flower.

Of course, to see the sharp detail of this image, it best viewed in a large size. To see the largest possible size on your particular screen, click the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

World of Chaos

Globe Thistle, Thistle, Flower, Blue
The globe thistle is a unique, flowering thistle and is garden friendly. It provides an appealing contrast of color and texture to the flower bed in mid summer.

I didn’t know these were called “Globe Thistles” until I looked them up to provide more info for this post. This photo was taken in one of the flowerbeds at our home.

According to Gardening Know How

Echinops is the botanical name for globe thistle. They are stunning flowers with deep dark blue petals set in a spiky frame. The leaves are deeply notched, dark green on top and slightly silver underneath and slightly hairy. The plants are native to Asia and Europe and the name means hedgehog in Greek, which is appropriately referencing the prickly blooms. Globe thistle flowers make excellent dried displays and last for years as part of an everlasting flower display.

You can get a better, more detailed view of this image by clicking on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Color Me Country

Rainbow, Rural, House, Kewaunee, WI
It doesn’t happen often, but when a rainbow appears it so much better when I can capture it.

On this occasion, I was mowing the lawn when it started to rain.  I turned my mower toward the garage and noticed the rainbow forming.  I parked the mower and dashed into the house for my camera and an umbrella.  I had just enough time to snap a few photos before it dissipated.

This is actually a panoramic image.  I stitched four, portrait oriented images together to capture what you see here.  My camera and lens could not capture a wide enough view to fit all of the rainbow in one shot. I may have been able to capture all of it with a different lens, but I didn’t want to take the time to change lenses and maybe miss the shot.

You can view a full-screen version of this image by clicking on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Evening In Duluth

Duluth, Minnesota, MN, Cityscape, Nightscape, Monochrome, B&W
The renowned Aerial Lift Bridge of Duluth, Minnesota is the prominent feature when overlooking the city at night. Well, anytime of day, for that matter.

This is an image I took from Enger Park, high on a hill overlooking the city.  I had scouted out a place to catch some good shots of the Duluth Canal area.  I knew they flood the bridge with lights at night and decided to try and capture the scene. It was a mildly-cool evening on July 16, 2017 and a bit breezy.

Now the rest of the story….  Earlier that day, my wife and I took a ride up the scenic coast to visit and photograph some waterfalls and lighthouses.  While working on shots of the Split Rock Lighthouse, standing on some rocks along the shore, my tripod-secured camera tipped over.  When it hit the rocks the lens broke off and went one direction, the camera went another direction and took a quick dip in the water.

I scrambled to grab it and believe I kept it from being submerged but it did get quite wet. Without the lens attached, the sensor area was open and had received some moisture.  I quickly did my best to dry everything. I don’t have cameras to spare…or the money to buy them…so it was a hugely, disheartening event. It put quite a crimp in the fun weekend we were having.

The more I examined the camera insides, the more water I could see.  With a soft dry cloth, I rubbed the mirror element.  I thought it was made of glass, and it may be, but it has some sort of plastic coating on it that I damaged. In the right light I could see a definite “L” like line.  The camera body, itself, was also jacked up.

Surprisingly, with another lens, I was able to get the camera to turn on and used it to take more photos there. It was having hiccups now and then – displays weren’t working right, occasional errors writing to memory, etc.  Still, I was happy it still showed life and was hoping it would dry out and function; albeit with some nasty scars.

It wasn’t until later, when I downloaded the photos to my computer that I could see the seriousness of the mirror damage I caused.  In a normal DLSR the mirror flips up, when you press the shutter, to expose the sensor to the image.  My Sony, mirrorless model, has a “translucent” mirror that reflects the image up to the viewfinder, but it doesn’t flip up to expose the sensor – the light actually passes through the mirror to the sensor. So any damage to the mirror will effect each image taken.

I’m sharing this long, sad, story to point out the flaws in the image I’ve posted here. You will notice the long light streaks on the right side of the bridge.  Those are a result of the damaged mirror. Also, the mushy bunch of lights just to the left of the bridge are from the damaged mirror.  The lights to the left should look like clear, individual dots similar to the dots inside the bridge frame.

The distortions were not so noticeable on the camera’s screen when viewing bright, daylight images. It’s painfully obvious with the night scenes. This could have been a very nice image and, I’m sure some will still like it, but I’ll always focus on it’s flaws. I debated with myself whether to post it and, of course, I decided to. I thought it would be interesting to see if anyone would comment on the flaws…who picked up on them without reading the details of this post. I wonder how many people might think it was some artistic effect.

As far as the camera goes, I had to replace it.  I believe it would have cost more to repair than it was worth.  I purchased the same model camera body (Sony A77) from a seller on eBay for half what a new one would cost. I had hoped to upgrade soon, but this unexpected expense will delay that for awhile. I was also able to order a part to fix the lens that was broken.  It was a lot harder to repair than I thought, but I got it done and it’s working perfectly.  It was a favorite lens, so I’m glad I didn’t have to replace it.

You can view a larger, more detailed version of this image – flaws and all – by clicking on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.