Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Spider Web

Dripping with Passion


Spider Web, Wet, Covered with Dew, Web, Dripping, PurpleOn a foggy morning, moisture clings to a spider web. I love how the tiniest drops can form on the thinnest of web fibers.

This is a companion to another image taken the same morning that I posted earlier.  (Connect the Dots)  The first one was photographed with a black background. This one had a maroon background because this spider web was draped from the door to the side mirror of my old van.

This is some of my first work with extension tubes – a lens attachment used in macro photography.  I need to work on sharpness.  This image is not quite as sharp as I want it to be, but it was interesting enough to share.

You can view a larger version of this image by clicking on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

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Connect the Dots

Web, Spider Web, Drops, Water, Dew, Bubbles
Moisture from a foggy morning collects like jewels on a tiny spider web.

Working on some macro photography and the foggy mornings have made spider webs particularly interesting.

You can view this image on a larger scale by clicking on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Click for Purchase Options

Web Warlord


Spider, Web, Macro, Arachnid
I spent a summer morning walking though the woods in Missouri trying to find a large spider. It wasn’t easy, but I did locate this big fella. I don’t know what kind of spider it is. Its body was equal to the size of the end of my index finger. It was just waiting for something to disturb the intricate fibers of its realm.

To get a better view, click on the photo and a larger version will open in a new browser tab.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Click for Purchase Options

Spider Assassin

Sure…she looks sweet, petite and innocent, but beneath that tiny hummingbird breast beats the heart of a skilled killer. She is a spider assassin! (By the way, that heart beats at about 250 beats per minute while resting and about 1,260 beats per minute while flying.)

This photo could be used as evidence in an avian court to convict her. You can clearly see strands of spider web stuck to her beak and a bit on her head. As further evidence, take a look at a photo I entitled Delicate Delight; posted a few days earlier.  If you look closely at this image of another female hummingbird captured in flight, you will notice little bits of spider web stuck to her beak, too.

Most people mistakenly think that a hummingbird’s diet consists solely of nectar from flowers and feeders that people hang in their garden.  Hummingbirds also need protein. They get that protein from a variety of bugs…including spiders.

And here’s another fascinating fact about the world’s tiniest birds – hummingbirds use spider webs to build their nests.

Here are some notes from worldofhummingbirds.com – –

Hummingbirds love to eat small bugs like gnats, aphids, and spiders. The hummingbirds will even eat all of the bugs out of the spider web, eat the spider, and then steal the web to help build a nest.

[To build a nest] She likes to use nice soft material like moss and lichen. She also likes to use cotton fluffs, bits of willows, soft plant pieces, dryer lint, and leaf hairs. She will bring these items back to her nest a little at a time, gluing it all together with spider webs. The spider webs make terrific glue for the nest, allow the nest to stretch and be flexible as the baby hummingbirds grow, and make it easier for the mother hummingbird to repair the nest when kids do what kids do.

If you learned something new and liked the photo, please share this post with a friend and leave a comment. (Thanks!)

(This image has been enlarged a great deal to make it easier to see the spider web.  If you’d like to see an even larger version, simply click on the photo.)