Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Tree

Tree Hugger

Butterfly, Wild, Nature, Tree, Moss, Small, Orange, Black
I love macro photography because it brings things that are small, and often missed, closeup and in sharp focus.  It reveals the detail that we rarely have the opportunity to observe and enjoy.

This small butterfly was one of several I found mingling around the base of a tree in the woods of Missouri.  It seemed like a gathering of old friends. Unfortunately, I was’t able to get a good shot of the group’s activity because, at the base of the tree, there was a good deal of tall grass that shielded my view. This momentary loner was kind enough to sit still long enough for me to snap its image. An online friend helped me identify this as a Hackberry Emperor butterfly.

By the way, the image you see here was flipped 180-degrees.  When I snapped it, the butterfly was facing downward. I thought it seemed more natural and a little easier on the eyes to have it positioned upward.

There is much more detail to be seen in the larger version. To see it, simply click on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Click for Purchase Options

Woodland Whites

The trees are coming to life after a long winter’s nap. They seem to do so with great deal of grace and exuberance!

These are the blooms from a flowering tree we spotted on a springtime walk through the woods. The delicate flowers were fresh and plentiful but, I’m sure, will be short lived.

You can get a better look at these blooms by viewing the larger version. Just click on the photo.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Click for Purchase Options

Tree Dwellers

Mushroom, Mushrooms, Tree, Woods, Woodland, Fungus, FungiOn a walk through the woods, I spotted this collection of mushrooms growing in the hollow of a large tree.  I thought the colors, textures and just the oddity of mushrooms growing in a tree made it an interesting sight.

You can enjoy more of the details in this image by clicking on the photo. Another browser tab will open to a larger view.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Click for Purchase Options

Tree Dwellers

Mushrooms, Fungi, Fungus, Tree, White Birch, Birch
It was a banner year for mushrooms in northeast Wisconsin.  An abundance of rainfall seemed to keep them sprouting up to, and even beyond, the first frosts.

I thought it was unusual to see so many mushrooms growing on a tree trunk. These healthy specimens were found in the woods of northeast Wisconsin.

To get a better view, click on the photo and a larger version will open in a new browser tab.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Click for Purchase Options

Fire Painters In the Sky

Sunrise, Water, Ripples, Sky, Trees, Lake, River, FloodThis image is a combination of stunning, natural beauty and a generous helping of digital magic.  Let me share some of the details.

This is one of my earliest photos taken with my first decent digital camera. The camera a Kodak EasyShare DX7590 that I purchased to document my first trip to Liberia, Africa in 1995 .  The DX7590 was a minor step up from a typical point-and-shoot camera with a whopping 5-megapixels. (Pretty impressive, in those days, for a small, consumer grade camera. My current camera provides 24-megapixels.)

This photo was taken in march of 2007.  At home in the early evening, I saw the wonderful colors in the sky out my living room window.  Of course, I grabbed my camera and dashed out the door.

I crossed the road in front of my house to be able to frame up the sky without any interference from the power lines and poles between me and the beauty. I included the dormant tree to add contrast and interest to the scene. I snapped several frames of the incredible sky with the trees and field before me.

If you haven’t guessed by now, the water you see in the foreground wasn’t part of the original scene.  I added the water, digitally, after the fact.  The lovely, rippling reflection of the water in this image replaced a barren farm field, mostly covered with melting snow.  You can see a couple of the original images I took – with out the water effect – in this earlier post:  Fire In the Sky

The farm field was dark and dreary, compared to the sky, so I thought it needed an upgrade.  I had been trying out a trial version of software developed to add a water effect and thought the reflective quality of water might add more interest and color to the bottom of the image.  In fact, I extended the bottom area of the photo, to fit more ripples in the view.

You can view a larger version of this photo by clicking on it.

Click for Purchase Options

Pink Pom Poms

Memosa, Tree, Pink, Poms, Flower

While visiting  relatives in Kansas, we enjoyed a stop at the Topeka Zoo.  Along with the expected variety of animals, they had a unexpected collection of attractive flowering plants.  I spotted the beautiful, unique blooms on this large tree and took a few photos.  I later learned this is a Mimosa Tree (Albizia julibrissin).

Though it is revered for its beautiful and fragrant blooms, the mimosa tree is considered an invasive species. It was brought to this continent from China as an ornamental plant about 250 years ago.  Like most invasive plants, it reproduces prolifically. The flat seedpods are numerous, tough and can remain dormant for decades, even over long periods of drought.

To view a larger view of this photo click on it.

Click for Purchase Options

Crooked Spine Pine II

Pine, Curve, Curved, Spiral, Potawatomi State Park, Door County, Bark, Leaves, Forest

This is another view of my Crooked Spine Pine – a true quirk of nature.  (See earlier post: Crooked Spine Pine – 2013)

Like Jack’s magic bean stalk, this pine tree is growing in a spiral at Potawatomi State Park in northeast Wisconsin.

It reminds me of a natural example of a rule of composition known as the Golden Mean, Phi, or Divine Proportion.  It was made poplar by Leonardo Fibonacci around 1200 A.D. You can learn more about it in an excellent article from Digital Photography School.

To view a larger version of this image, click on the photo.

Click for Purchase Options

Crooked Spine Pine – 2013

Crooked, Curve, Curvy, Pine, Tree, Forest
FINALLY – We found it!!  As you can see, this is a very unique tree.  This tree has eluded me for years. Let me explain…

In 2006, while hiking on a trail through the woods, we came across this tree. It was in the middle of the trail, so we weren’t the only ones who’ve seen it. But I’m guessing most people didn’t look at it from the angle I photographed it, so they wouldn’t realize the cool curve of its growth.

I took a few photos of it.  Sometime after that, I posted my best photo of the “Crooked Spine Pine” on Flickr. (That was before I had this blog.) It turned out to be one of the most popular photos I’ve ever posted. A number of people questioned its authenticity – accusing me of “photoshopping” it.

Back when I took the original photo, in 2006, I had a simple 5-megapixel camera. The photo of this tree was unique, but it really wasn’t a great image, technically speaking. Since then I’ve upgraded considerably.

For the last several years, I’ve been trying to find this tree again – to get better photos. However, I wasn’t sure exactly where it was. I thought it was at Potawatomi State Park, near Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. We spent a number of visits, hiking the trails looking for the tree. After having no success, I began to think maybe it was on a trail at Peninsula State Park, farther up Door County, near Sister Bay, WI. We had hiked trails and took photos at both parks.  We also had to consider the possibility that the tree was no longer there – blown over in a storm or claimed by disease or insects.

Pine, Tree, Forest, Woods, Trail, CrookedWe began to keep better track of what trails we had hiked on and in the process, we’ve hiked a lot of trails and even enlisted the help of friends, in search of this one tree. Recently, my wife and I spent a day hiking the trails at Peninsula State Park totaling about seven-and-a-half hours. No luck. So, maybe it wasn’t at Peninsula, but at Potawatomi.

Last Friday, Sara (my wife) and I decided to spend the day together.  It was a nice day so we decided to hike the trails at Potawatomi State Park. We hiked the Hemlock Trail – about a two mile loop. While hiking, I noticed a spur off the trail and thought we should check that out some time.  Hemlock turned back and we came along another spur that I thought might be the other end of the spur we passed earlier.  We decided to head up that little stretch to see what was there and, low and behold, there was the tree.

In our search over the years, no doubt we had hiked the Hemlock Trail before, but never took that little detour. We were joyful to have finally located it, took photos, marked it on a trail map, took GPS coordinates. We will not have any problems finding it in the future.  If you’d like to see it for yourself, hike the Hemlock Trail and take the bike trail in the northern part of the loop.

To view a larger version of either of these photos, just click on them.

All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

Click for Purchase Options

Opening Ceremony

Flowers, Bloom, Spring, Branch, Tree, Apple Blossoms, Monochrome, B&W

Early spring gives us some of it’s first blooming beauty on the trees. This bunch of blossoms, was part of springtime’s opening ceremony. They were perfectly position at the end of a low hanging branch, discovered on a walk through a local wooded area.

I decided to take on the challenge of processing these as a monochrome image. Since they were white flowers, it proved to be more of a challenge than I bargained for. It’s difficult to maintain any kind of detail with all that white.

To get a better view, click on the image.

Click for Purchase Options