Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Predator

Some of Your Beeswax

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Considering the Next Move

Sugar and Spice

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

White

Soft Touch

Flower, Green, White, Leaves, CyclamenThis is a flower that seems to bloom backward. The flower head is pointed down (notice the downward direction of the buds to each side) but the petals turn up. This plant is part of the Cyclamen genus.

I’d like to tell you that I took this photo of an exotic plant in some exotic foreign land but, alas, it was taken in the kitchen of our home. I was working on my camera, making micro-adjustments to the focus of my various lenses. It’s a process of fine tuning the auto focus function to account for the minor differences in lenses.  Even lenses of the same brand and model can have minor differences. The camera will focus each of them the same so focus could be off…usually just a bit and mostly unnoticeable, but still off.  Of course, we’re typically wanting a very precise focus on most of our images so tweaking settings to get it as close to perfect is a worthwhile endeavor.

So, after making my micro-adjustments, I just snapped a few photos to test the focus accuracy. This is one of those test shots. The plant is one my wife keeps on a cabinet in front of a window in our kitchen. I focused on it, taking advantage of the pleasing green of our lawn outside the window as the background. Of course, the lawn is out of the range of focus so you’re not seeing blades of grass; you just see a solid green background. You’ll also notice a kind of cross-hatch texture in the background. That effect was created by the window’s screen.

Sometimes, if your looking, you’ll find “interesting” and “exotic” in the most common places.

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Bride and Bridesmaids

Flowers, Daisy, Daisies, White, Yellow
Sometimes, it’s the simple beauty that most easily captures me.  Pleasing colors. Interesting shapes. A bit of texture. Uncommon perspective.

I found this collection of flowers while on another photographic mission.  I was out early one morning to snap some photos of a couple of tall ships that were docked in the Kewaunee harbor.  I parked my car in a lot near by and started working.  At some point, I looked back and noticed a beautiful flower garden surrounding a nearby home. These flowers – the white one, in particular – immediately caught my eye.

I took quite a few photos of the ships, but this one may be my favorite of the morning.

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All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

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Spring Bloomers

Dicentra Cucullaria, Dutchman's Breeches, Wildflowers, Macro
These are one of my wife’s favorite wildflowers. She can’t help but comment on how adorable they are. They are Dutchman’s Breeches. (Dicentra Cucullaria)

These unique wildflowers get their name from the shape of the flowers. They resemble pantaloons hanging upside down and slightly inflated.  The yellow adornment at the bottom of the flower resembles a belt on the pantaloons.  (I think they look more like old-fashioned bloomers.  That’s why I titled this image, Spring Bloomers.  That, and because they bloom very early in the spring.)

In our area they begin to show up in early May. The flowers are approximately 3/4 inch in length and white to pinkish in color. The blooms dangle down from thin stalks rising from the lush green plant. According to Wikipedia, Native Americans and early white practitioners considered this plant useful for syphilis, skin conditions and as a blood purifier.

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Ladies In White

Tulips, White Tulips, Bokeh, Flowers, Beautiful
The muted sunlight coming from behind these white tulips gave the flowers a unique quality.  These early spring beauties were photographed at Pella, Iowa.  Each year Pella has a tulip festival.

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Paper Kite

Butterfly, Paper Kite, Black, White, Wings, Idea leuconoe
This beautiful, high-contrast butterfly is known by the name, Paper Kite.  It’s technical name is Idea Leuconoe.  The name game doesn’t stop there, either.  It’s also called a Wood Nymph butterfly, Large Tree Nymph butterfly or simply, Rice Paper butterfly.

The Paper Kite has a weak, fluttery flight interspersed with gliding due to the high ratio of their wing-size to body-size.  You would think, with their bright color and bold  pattern, they would easily fall victim to predators, but like monarch butterflies, they are poisonous or highly unpalatable and are not often attacked.

The Paper Kite’s natural territory is Southeast Asia.  Apparently, it is a common resident in butterfly greenhouses and live butterfly expositions. I found this one at the Butterfly Palace and Rainforest Adventure in Branson, MO.

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All of the photos I post are available for purchase. If you’d like to buy one, click on the blue “Buy this Online” bar below for a variety of print and frame options or contact me for digital purchase and licensing options.

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Fall Floral Outburst

Flowers, Wildflowers, Floral, White
These festive wildflowers were growing on a bush at the edge of our property.  I don’t know what kind of flowers (or weed) they are, but they were some of the last blooms of the fall.

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Sprig of Pearls

White Berries, Autumn, Fall Colors, Berries

Autumn is wrapping up in our area – as far as colorful foliage goes.  These white berries stand out next to the normally green leaves of this plant I found on the edge of a wooded area.

I spent a good deal of time trying to identify this plant.  I wasn’t able to find anything I could be confident to share.  It seems to be a common plant in our area.

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Wild and Woolly

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar, Caterpillar, Orange, Black, Milkweed

This is one hungry, little dust-mop! Look at how much of that leaf it’s already consumed. It is a Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar.

When I took this picture, I didn’t notice the interesting, synchronized curl to those orange and white tufts of hair. It just looked like your run-of-the-mill fuzzy caterpillar. Enlarging the image, often reveals surprising aspects of the insect world.

By the way, the head is that shiny black part on the edge of the leaf, mostly covered by hair.  (He needs to trim his bangs.)

This was actually in a very difficult spot to photograph due to other vegetation being in the way. To try and get a better shot, I slowly, gently bent the leaf he was on. They must not have sticky feet because, at the slightest angel, it immediately slid off the leaf and into the dense weeds below…never to be seen again.

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