Archives
A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Predator

Some of Your Beeswax

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Sugar and Spice

Front Porch Portrait

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

WI

Point of Inspiration

This is one of my favorites of the many photos I took Saturday morning (07/23/11).   It’s not the image I was going after but, believe me, I am not disappointed.

I made a special point of getting up early and heading to the harbor in Algoma, WI in hopes of capturing a beautiful sunrise. The sky looked promising as I drove, however, when I got to the harbor, it was enveloped by fog. There wasn’t going to be a sunrise to photograph. I decided to stick around anyway and capture some images of the lighthouse in the fog.  Since fog has a way of draining everything of color, I switched to shooting in black and white.

Eventually the fog lifted some, the sun got higher and I kept snapping.  This is the first of several images I’ll be sharing from that morning. Check back often.

I haven’t done much in black and white but after this series of photos, I think I’ll be doing more.

(To see a larger version of this image, click on the photo.)

Conspicuous Display

This is another shot from this year’s fireworks show at Kewaunee’s Trout Festival.  (7/15/11)

Again, the firework’s bold burst, the reflection off the water, the full moon and the detail of the harbor at night combine to make this one of my favorites.

I have a hand full of other images of the Trout Fest fireworks that I will be posting now and then.  Check back regularly. And, by all means, feel free to share the link to theses posts with others.

Depending on the size of your monitor, you may be able to see a larger version of this image by clicking on it.

Harbor Lights

The full moon staged a dramatic entrance near the Kewaunee, WI lighthouse on Friday, July 15, 2011.

It was the first night of Kewaunee’s annual Trout Festival. I had scouted out the area and selected a spot to take photos of the upcoming fireworks show. While waiting, the moon slowly emerged from the horizion – starting out to the left of the lighthouse and moving directly behind the lighthouse and beyond, as you can see.  

I was excited to be able to be in the perfect spot to catch the two together. There was one spoiler, though.  The pier to the lighthouse happens to be the site of the fireworks launch. The technicians putting on the fireworks show were on the pier, as were their vehicles and equipment.  Photoshop to the rescue!

The image to the right is the original, untouched, photo that I snapped.  The moon and lighthouse together still make a cool image, but I thought they would be better without the distracting clutter. It took a little time to digitally clear the pier, but I think the final product was worth it.

Feel free to leave a comment and give me your opinion.

If you like this post, spread it around by sharing it with your friends.

 

To see a larger version of the main image, simply click on it.

Full Moon and Fireworks

The folks who attended the 2011 Kewaunee Trout Festival enjoyed two spectacular displays…the fireworks show and a full moon.

I positioned myself at nearly surface level with the Kewaunee harbor in order to capture the reflection off the water.  I think the reflections are as appealing as any other part of the images.  In fact, I’m considering combining a number of the firework reflections to create a colorful image of its own.

This was my first opportunity to capture fireworks with my Sony SLT-A55V.  I wish the fireworks show was a few hours long, rather than a few minutes.  I need that kind of time to really experiment with settings and angles, etc.  

For my photography friends, here are some of the specifics… Of course, I had the camera on a tripod, had it in manual mode, on the “Bulb” setting and used a remote trigger…F/11.0, ISO 200, 13-seconds, 28.0 mm.

I’m pleased with a number of the images I captured and will be posting more, so check back. Or, better yet, just subscribe to the RSS Feed.

Both of these images (especially the smaller one) are better when bigger – so click them to see a larger view.

Kewaunee Morning Glory

Sometimes being up before sunrise pays off.  As evidence, I offer another image captured last Saturday morning (6/18/11).

This is a pre-sunrise view of the lighthouse and pier that extends into Lake Michigan at Kewaunee, WI.  This was taken a little before 5 am. I was on the small beach just south of the pier.

If you find this image appealing, I encourage you to share it.  Facebook users can simply click the button below.  All comments are appreciated.

(Click the image to view a larger version.)

Stopped by the Sunrise

As soon as I got up this morning, I headed to the beach in Kewaunee, WI.  I thought this might be a good morning for some sunrise photos of the Kewaunee’s lighthouse on the shores of Lake Michigan. I got plenty of good images.

In this shot, someone, on an early morning walk (shortly after 5 am) along the pier, stops to take in the beautiful sunrise. I’m not positive, but I think they had a camera and were taking pictures.

(Click on the image to view a larger version.)

Kewaunee’s Premium Blend

The best part of waking up…  The sky provided a blend of beautiful colors, layered from the red of the sun on the horizon to the blue, high in the early morning sky.

I made my way to the shore of Lake Michigan – to the Kewaunee, WI beach – to catch a 5:40 am sunrise on the morning of Saturday, April 30, 2011.

It’s interesting to see the different transformations that the sky goes through in the course of a half hour sunrise.  For a different look of the same sunrise, see my previous post “Morning Beam.”

(Click the photo for a slightly larger view.)

Morning Beam

I got up early last Saturday to take sunrise photos of the Kewaunee, WI lighthouse.  This is a photo from the end of the shoot.  The sun was up enough that it was out of the frame but you can’t miss it’s power by the prominent beam of light.

More from this shoot will be posted in the next few days. Keep checking back or simply subscribe to the RSS feed.

(Click on the image for a larger view.)

Sandhill Crane

This is a Sandhill Crane. They’ve recently migrated back to our area of Wisconsin. You know their back in the area long before you see one by their amazingly loud and irritating call. Sandhill Cranes are large birds, standing nearly 4 ft tall with a wingspan of 6 to 8 feet. (Learn more about Sandhill Cranes HERE)

These exotic birds have become common during the warmer months but are very difficult to photograph (at least, for me) because they are extremely shy.  When you attempt to get close enough to capture a good image they flee.

This opportunity came by chance.  I was driving home and noticed a pair of cranes grazing near the road a couple of hundred yards before my house.  I drove by and turned around when I thought I was far enough away that I wouldn’t spook them.  I got my camera out of the case and then headed back down the road.  (I try to always keep my camera with me.)

I took this photo while driving with one hand holding the camera and one hand on the wheel.  I was the only vehicle on the road and moved as slow as I thought I could without sending the birds to flight.  Even at 30-mph, the cranes became agitated and started to move.  They were out of range before I could circle back for another shot.

I will keep a lookout for more opportunities to capture Sandhill Cranes.  If I succeed, you’ll see them on this blog.

(Click the photo to view a larger image.)