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A Sample of Pop’s “Bee” Images

Sedum Bumbler

Look of Defiance

Chicory Bee

Bumbling Bees

Garden Cafe

Buzz By Here - To Infinity and Beyond

Pick Your Poison

Blind Side Attack

On a Mission

Honey Bee on Sedum

Covering the Cosmos

Center of the Cosmos

Three's a Crowd

Popular Spot

On A Pedestal

On Golden Rod

The Beeline

Messy Hands

Bee on Yellow

Incoming

Bumble Bee Choreography

Messy Hands

A Sample of Pop’s “People” Photo Collection

Caged Competitor

Early Adoration

Child In the Ligtht

Stroll Through the Weeds

Attention Grabbing

Eye Contact

On the Line

Eyes of Wonder

Rounding the Curve

Troubadours of Basin Spring Park

Down by the Creek

Sun Day

Catching Some Light

EAA Fireworks

Hear Me Roar

Yellow

Road to Nowhere

Road, Yellow Line, Fog, Foggy, Rural, Perspective, Bill Pevlor, Pops Digital

On a foggy winter morning I was out snapping scenery. I decided to take a different perspective on a road near our home.

This is one of those images where you can stare and contemplate what deep meaning the artist was trying to convey.  (That’s what I’m doing.)

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Bird’s Foot Trefoil

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This is a flower known as Bird’s Foot Trefoil.  This is a close-up, top-view of one of tiny flower clusters – about the size of a quarter. It has been growing extremely well in our area this year during our very dry summer we are  having.  It’s a plant that grows in bright yellow clumps, low to ground. I’ve always considered a pretty wildflower, but most consider it a weed in these parts.

According to Wikipedia…

It is a perennial herbaceous plant, similar in appearance to some clovers. The flowers develop into small pea-like pods or legumes. The name ‘bird’s foot’ refers to the appearance of the seed pods on their stalk. There are five leaflets, but with the central three held conspicuously above the others, hence the use of the name trefoil.

It is used in agriculture as a forage plant, grown for pasture, hay, and silage. It may be used as an alternative to alfalfa in poor soils. It has become an invasive species in some regions of North America and Australia.

The plant has had many common names, which are now mostly out of use. These names were often connected with the yellow and orange colour of the flowers, e.g. Butter and Eggs. One name that is still used is Eggs and Bacon.

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Popular Spot

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Flowers are blooming and the bees are buzzing.  This proved to be a popular spot in the meadow.  Honey bees and bumble bees were frequenting this clump of purple spiderswort. It was early morning – maybe 6:30 (notice the dew still on the plants) – and they were already hard at it.

To get this shot, I put my camera on a tripod and simply focused on a colorful, well lit clump of flowers and waited.  When a bee would enter into the scene, I would start clicking.  The bees you see here are exactly how I photographed them…but they were never in the shot together.  Since the focus and framing never changed, it was easy to combine the various bees from separate images into one.

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